SLVA: Automotive Studio — Logo Designs & Work

Logo design created for SLVA: Automotive Studio.

This project was done in conjunction with Grenadier, an agency based in Boulder, Colorado. The project undertook “making over” a car customizer. The project entailed renaming his shop, developing a brand to go along with the name, as well as strategy with regard to focus on the business direction. Brown Hornet Design assisted by developing a logo that evoked the heritage of the shop owner and connected with the visual language of the market.

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Additional identity work from this project:

And here’s an image of the post-production:

 

And from the drawing boards:

From First Review Email …

“Not to talk all over them, but a little preamble: general focus is branding that serves as badges as well. Typography in most cases is handcrafted, with exception of F).

E) features an approach with the lion—the crest animal of the Silva Family name (lots of families use the lion, though. Also, technically speaking, the surname meaning is “wood” and was the name of the royal family of Spain, but the name’s relative ubiquity possibly translated into it being the name of a village of the royal family, etc–wikipedia… Bottom line: there’s possibly something to all that, but the fact the client doesn’t have a family history in cars and the family is sort of a regular working family, I didn’t press it much except buying the lion as an emblem like the Ferrari bought the horse (turns out traditionally, Germans were know for putting horses on their cars more until Ferrari did it) … To some extent this was something worth exploring even more… I concepted a few crests/shields and crests (I included one that I whipped up for discussion’s sake that sort of look like a soccer team’s logo or a Ferrari logos).”

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4 Replies to “SLVA: Automotive Studio — Logo Designs & Work”

    1. Thanks for the observation… Hopefully, you’ll notice in the sketch work, we didn’t have that as starting point, but the notion utilizing the client name (Silva) and the conceptual framework of using a forward-leaning typeface that could come off of a car since the client is in the customized fabrication business. While the nameplate is “custom” as a “typeface” it needn’t be “unique” I’d argue.

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